Muttai Barotta (Leftover Poori and Egg Scramble)

We in Thirunelveli are quite indifferent to the names of North Indian dishes. The P in Parathas and Pooris is always pronounced as a B, giving us Barotta and Booris. The term barotta was picked up from the chopped up parathas served as street food in bus stations. A similar technique was applied to use the leftover pooris in households.

Muttai Barotta 1 - Kalas Kalai

Muttai Barotta (Leftover Poori and Egg Scramble)

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Poori Urulaikizhangu (Potato Curry for Deep Fried Wheat Bread)

Pooris are usually served with the potato masala that is used in Masala Dosai. In my family, hailing from Thirunelveli, the potato masala we serve is completely different, and spicier, than the usual masala. We include tomatoes and chilli powder, which transforms the flavour. We serve this potato masala with chappatis too.

Poori Urulaikizhangu - Kalas Kalai

Poori Urulaikizhangu (Potato Curry for Deep Fried Wheat Bread)

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Eral and Pavakkai Poriyal (Prawn and Bitter Gourd Fry)

Prawns always help add flavour to vegetable dishes. This recipe comes from my Burma repatriate friend. When she told me that her mother combines prawn with bitter gourd I was shocked and sceptical about the taste of the product because the bitter gourd, as the name suggests, has a very strong, bitter flavour. Still, I got the recipe from her and decided to try it at home. To my amazement and pleasure, I found that this is one of the most delectable preparations of prawn with another vegetable.

Eral and Pavakkai Poriyal - Kalas Kalai

Eral and Pavakkai Poriyal (Prawn and Bitter Gourd Fry)

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Keerai Poriyal (Greens Fry)

We usually cook our greens in India – we do not make salads with them. The south has a variety of greens: Amaranth, Drumstick, Agathi, Ponnanganni, and of course the Palak, which we call Pasalai Keerai. We use all these greens in Tamil Nadu to make poriyal (fry). I have chosen greens from the Amaranth family because they are easily available in all the stores or brought to your doorstep by street vendors. I used to be woken up at 5.30 in the morning by the clarion call ‘Keeraiiiii!’ from an enthusiastic vendor.

Keerai Poriyal - Kalas Kalai

Keerai Poriyal

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