Eral and Murungai Keerai Poriyal (Prawn and Drumstick Leaves Fry)

We Tamilians love our drumstick trees, and in villages every house would have one. In Chennai, however, only those with large plots of land have them and the rest of us have to buy drumstick leaves from stores. Drumstick leaves are used to make poriyal (fry). They are not usually combined with other vegetables, but non-vegetarians cook these with either fresh or dry prawns (karuvadu).

Prawns and Drumstick Leaves Poriyal 1 - Kalas Kalai

Eral and Murungai Keerai Poriyal (Prawn and Drumstick Leaves Fry)

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Thirattuppaal (Tamil Milk Kova with Coconut)

Happy Deepavalli everyone! In Tamil, Thirattuppaal means milk condensed to a semi-solid consistency. This is a speciality of Tamil Nadu, but it is curiously, nowadays, neither made at home nor found in shops, maybe because the North Indian milk sweets have become very popular. I chose this as a Deepavalli special as it can be made at home quite easily – but not quickly 🙂 – instead of buying sweets from stores, which is now the norm but also very expensive.

Thirattuppaal - Kalas Kalai

Thirattuppaal (Tamil Milk Kova with Coconut)

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Carrot Tomato Curry

I have come across a wide variety of dishes from many states as students from all across India attended Women’s Christian College, Chennai. This is a dish from Andhra Pradesh. My student M.S. Vani prepared this dish in my dietetics lab session. I was very impressed by its nutritive value, and the dish was novel to me. I got the recipe from her and modified it by adding onion to improve the flavour. I also reworked the cooking method to cook the tomatoes with the onions and boiled the carrots to remove the raw flavour.

Carrot Tomato Curry - Kalas Kalai

Carrot Tomato Curry

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Sadha Mutton Pirattal (Simple Mutton Curry)

Pirattal in Tamil means stirring or turning. My mother called this recipe sadha meaning plain/ordinary/simple. It does live up to its name as only the coconut and ginger-garlic paste need grinding. She used only garlic, but I have substituted it with ginger-garlic paste to spice it up. This pirattal is so easy to prepare that even cooking noobs can try it 🙂

Sadha Mutton Pirattal - Kalas Kalai

Sadha Mutton Pirattal (Simple Mutton Curry)

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Vazhaikkai Cutlet (Unripe Banana Cutlet)

Vazhaikkai (unripe bananas/plantains) are available round the year if you are lucky enough to live in South India :). The bananas are used in a variety of dishes as part of a dish like aviyal or kootanchoru, or as the primary ingredient in preparations like these cutlets. I have adapted this recipe from my grandmother’s vazhaikkai vadais. I prefer this as it is shallow fried with very little oil.

Vazhaikkai Cutlet - Kalas Kalai

Vazhaikkai Cutlet

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Meen Asaadhu (Thirunelveli Fish Curry in Coconut Milk)

Meen Asaadhu is a recipe which my mother had copied from her grandmother’s book but she never prepared. I was always curious about it and tried it only when I was able to get skinless and boneless fish cubes (when I moved near the sea 10 years ago). My great-grandmother had recommended either pomfret or barracuda, but you can use other any other marine fish which could be prepared into cubes. I prefer to use black pomfret.

Meen Asaadu - Kalas Kalai

Meen Asaadhu (Thirunelveli Fish Curry in Coconut Milk)

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Ravai Idly (Steamed Semolina Savoury Cakes)

I don’t believe Ravai Idly is native to Tamil Nadu, though Tamil Nadu is famous for its rice idlies. I have no recollection of my mother ever making ravai idlies. I came across ravai idlies only in cookery books. This dish uses curds to prepare the batter, and as I used to rack my brains for ways to utilise the leftover curds at home, I decided to give this a try. I was very pleased with the flavour of the idlies and the substantial breakfast they made.

 

Ravai Idly - Kalas Kalai
Ravai Idlies with idly plates

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