Thirattuppaal (Tamil Milk Kova with Coconut)

Happy Deepavalli everyone! In Tamil, Thirattuppaal means milk condensed to a semi-solid consistency. This is a speciality of Tamil Nadu, but it is curiously, nowadays, neither made at home nor found in shops, maybe because the North Indian milk sweets have become very popular. I chose this as a Deepavalli special as it can be made at home quite easily – but not quickly 🙂 – instead of buying sweets from stores, which is now the norm but also very expensive.

Thirattuppaal - Kalas Kalai

Thirattuppaal (Tamil Milk Kova with Coconut)

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Sadha Mutton Pirattal (Simple Mutton Curry)

Pirattal in Tamil means stirring or turning. My mother called this recipe sadha meaning plain/ordinary/simple. It does live up to its name as only the coconut and ginger-garlic paste need grinding. She used only garlic, but I have substituted it with ginger-garlic paste to spice it up. This pirattal is so easy to prepare that even cooking noobs can try it 🙂

Sadha Mutton Pirattal - Kalas Kalai

Sadha Mutton Pirattal (Simple Mutton Curry)

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Meen Asaadhu (Thirunelveli Fish Curry in Coconut Milk)

Meen Asaadhu is a recipe which my mother had copied from her grandmother’s book but she never prepared. I was always curious about it and tried it only when I was able to get skinless and boneless fish cubes (when I moved near the sea 10 years ago). My great-grandmother had recommended either pomfret or barracuda, but you can use other any other marine fish which could be prepared into cubes. I prefer to use black pomfret.

Meen Asaadu - Kalas Kalai

Meen Asaadhu (Thirunelveli Fish Curry in Coconut Milk)

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Ravai Idly (Steamed Semolina Savoury Cakes)

I don’t believe Ravai Idly is native to Tamil Nadu, though Tamil Nadu is famous for its rice idlies. I have no recollection of my mother ever making ravai idlies. I came across ravai idlies only in cookery books. This dish uses curds to prepare the batter, and as I used to rack my brains for ways to utilise the leftover curds at home, I decided to give this a try. I was very pleased with the flavour of the idlies and the substantial breakfast they made.

 

Ravai Idly - Kalas Kalai
Ravai Idlies with idly plates

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Chicken Ă  la King

Chicken à la King seems to have been a favourite of the British Raj in India, perhaps because all the ingredients were available here, and the flavour, though rich, is bland. I have come across various recipes using egg yolk, wine, etc., but adding wine somehow gives a fermented flavour, which we Indians regard as the beginning of spoilage. Therefore, I searched for a recipe which was simple and, at the same time, wholesome. I found one in Children’s Party Cooking. Of course I had to tweak the recipe to suit the Indian palate and the ingredients available.

Chicken a la King - Kalas Kalai

Chicken Ă  la King

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Jam Cookies

I always drooled over the jam cookies filling the old-fashioned glass jars on bakery shelves. The crunch of the crisp cookies with the sharp taste and sticky texture of jam used to fascinate me. My daughter and I came across several recipes using jam on cookies, but none of them matched the traditional ones, so my daughter developed this recipe. It is absolutely delicious. This cookie is even crisper than the store-bought cookies.

Jam Cookies 1- Kalas Kalai

Jam Cookies

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Soft Curd Cookies

My daughter and I dislike the artificial flavour of store-bought cookies/biscuits and prefer to bake our own. In our search for cookie recipes that used ingredients commonly available in Chennai, we came across this delicious cookie recipe in The Cookie Cookbook. These are soft cookies and will be enjoyed by children as well as the elderly. The original recipe used sour cream, and we modified it to use leftover curds.

Soft Curd Cookies - Kalas Kalai

Soft Curd Cookies

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